Ratings, comments, and collaboration

A requirement for any documentation that I create is that readers can rate and comment on the docs. I’ve been publishing documentation to systems that support this for about 10 years now, with a short gap in there. Not every tech writer agrees that these are necessary, or even desirable, so I’d like to analyze my reasons for being so stubborn about it.

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Docs and sales and changing roles

My role is changing again, but this time back towards tech writing and support. I’m moving away from customer success, and away from direct training; but to be honest, I hadn’t been doing much of either, so it really comes down to continuing to do what I’ve been doing. Although that will probably change, and expand, in the future.

Confusing? Yeah, to me, too, but it’s not at all bad. And I think it reflects something becoming more common for us content creators.

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Tech writers: The bard class of the corporate world

In D&D and related role-playing games (Dungeons and Dragons, and yes, I’m going full geek), the Bard character class gains a ton of skills: They’re a bit fighter, a bit thief (or rogue, if you prefer), and also have a bit of magical ability.

The point is: They’re flexible. They’ll never hit as hard as a fighter, aren’t as sneaky as a thief, and won’t cast as many spells as a wizard. But because they don’t specialize, they’re useful in many situations, and they’re often an asset to adventuring parties.

Lots of skills, very versatile, an asset to their team…just like technical writers!

Ok, I sense your doubt. Let me explain.

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